Free Office Finder has compiled below a comprehensive list of different roles within the property industry, with a detailed description of responsibilities and qualifications for each specific role.

 

A Chartered Surveyor is someone who is a professional member of the RICS (Royal Institute of Chartered Surveyors), and is entitled to use MRICS after their names. They will have taken the APC (Assessment of Professional Competence) and thus become chartered. They are highly trained and experienced property professionals who offer impartial, specialist advice on property related issues, as well as providing a variety of services. See below for more information on specialised types of Surveyors.

 

Building Surveyor

A Building Surveyor offers advice on property and construction, as well as completing building surveys which identify defects. They then recommend repair and maintenance options. Another aspect of the role is working on the design and development of new buildings, which can range from modest structures to larger and more important ones. 

Responsibilities include:

• Completing projects according to the given budget and schedule.
• Preparing scheme designs with costs.
• Determining the condition of existing buildings, identifying defects, giving advice on repairs.
• Offering advice on energy savings, environmental impact and sustainable construction.
• Advising on the preservation and conservation of historic buildings.
• Dealing with planning applications and advising on property legislation and building regulations.
•Advising on health and safety.

Salary:

• £22,000 – £26,000 in the first few years, and up to £50,000 with experience. The average salary is £44,000. 

What to study:

• BSc Building Surveying, or a postgraduate course in surveying if your undergraduate degree is not related. 

Where to study:

• Birmingham City University
• University of Reading
• UWE Bristol
• London South Bank University
• University of Salford
• Sheffield Hallam University
• Leeds Beckett University
• Coventry University
• Northumbria University
• University of Westminster
• University of Wolverhampton
• Nottingham Trent University
• University of Brighton
• University of Portsmouth
• University of Central Lancashire
• University of Huddersfield
• Glasgow Caledonian University
• Plymouth University 

  

Quantity Surveyor

A Quantity Surveyor manages all costs related to building and civil engineering projects. They aim to keep the costs of a project to a minimum and raise the value for money, while still maintaining the required standards and quality. Quantity Surveyors work for either a client or a contractor, in-office or on site. They are involved in every step of a project, and create reports throughout if any variations occur to the contract.

Responsibilities include:

• Preparing contracts and tenders.
• Initiating cost analysis for repairs and maintenance work on a project.
• Carrying out risk, value management and cost control.
• Identifying responses to commercial risks.
• Offering advice on contractual claims.
• Writing progress reports on outcomes.
• Understanding health and safety regulations.

Salary:

• £20,000 - £30,000 in the first few years, up to £65,000 in a senior level position.

What to study:

• BSc Quantity Surveying

Where to study:

• London South Bank University
• University of Portsmouth
• Kingston University
• Edinburgh Napier University
• Birmingham City University
• University of Salford
• Sheffield Hallam University
• UWE Bristol
• Leeds Beckett University
• University of Reading
• Coventry University
• Nottingham Trent University
• Glasgow Caledonian University
• University of Central Lancashire
• University of Huddersfield
• University of Wolverhampton
• Northumbria University

 

Land/Geomatics Surveyor

Land Surveying is a good career for those who have an analytical way of thinking, and who are good at reading maps and applying technology. Land surveyors measure and collect data on specific areas of land (natural and man-made) and assess land that is due for redevelopment. The term “geomatics” is also used to describe land surveying. 

Responsibilities include:

• Using geographical information systems to analyse and interpret site features, producing information which will then be analysed by planners, builders and cartographers.
• Producing surveys using GPS and other equipment.
• Measuring factors such as small and large distances, angles and elevations.
• Gathering data on the earth’s physical and man-made features through surveys.
• Carrying out digital mapping.
• Interpreting data using maps, charts and plans.
• Using computer-aided design to interpret data.
• Advising clients.

Salary:

• £20,000 to £25,000 in the first few years, and up to £70,000 at senior level.

What to study:

• BSc Land Surveying

Where to study:

• University of East London
• Newcastle University
• University of Brighton
• University of Wolverhampton
• Birmingham City University
• University of South Wales

 

Technical Surveyor

 

Technical Surveyors carry out tasks to support chartered surveyors, architects and engineers.

Responsibilities include:

• Drafting plans using computer-aided design software.
• Estimating and drawing up project costs.
• Gathering and analysing data for plans and reports.
• Assisting with environmental impact assessments.
• Surveying buildings or mapping land use.
• Valuing land, property and machinery.
• Organising the sale of assets by auction.
• Supervising construction operatives on site.
• Scheduling workloads and monitoring the progress of projects.

Salary:

• The starting salary for a Technical Surveyor is £18,000 to £22,000.
• An experienced Technical Surveyor will earn up to £28,000, and those in senior roles will make £32,000 or more.

What to study:

• A degree in Land, Building Surveying, Estate Management, Planning and Development, Property Development, Real Estate will be of use for an individual who wants to go into Technical Surveying. 

 

Planning and Development Surveyor 

     

A Planning and Development Surveyor carries out research to advise clients on their development and investment choices. They advise on planning and development in public and private sectors, and take into account economic, social and environmental factors that help clients make informed choices about investment. 

Responsibilities include:

• Assessing land and property use requirements.
• Managing projects.
• Identifying new opportunities by conducting research and networking.
• Interpreting data.
• Advising clients on the feasibility of planning permission.
• Preparing applications for planning permission.
• Considering the physical, environmental and social impact of proposed developments.
• Advocating the conservation and protection of historic or environmentally sensitive sites and areas.
• Specialising in areas such as planning and development policy, development and regeneration appraisal, planning and implementation processes, compulsory purchase and related compensation. 

Salary:

• Starting salaries start from £20,000 to £25,000.
• Experienced surveyors can earn from £30,000 to £42,000 and those in senior positions can earn up to £70,000.

What to study:

• Many organisations will sponsor conversion training while you are employed if your undergraduate degree is not property-related. However, the following degree courses can help: Building Surveying, Estate Management, Planning and Development, Property Development, Real Estate.

 

Auctioneer

Property auctioneers are specialised surveyors who estimate the market value of property and land for their clients. They inspect and investigate a property, and consider factors such as location and business. After advising on sales, compensation claims or loans, auctioneers organise and manage auctions.

Responsibilities include:

• Carrying out inspections of buildings and land to identify characteristics affecting value.
• Giving clients a realistic valuation of their property and providing advice on acquisition, sales or investment.
• Writing reports of inspections.
• Providing information and valuations for businesses or legal organisations to resolve disputes, help with compensation claims or investment queries.
• Managing auctions and organising the marketing for them.

Salary:

• The average salary of a Property Auctioneer is £42,500.

What to study:

• Real Estate Management, Property Development and Valuation, Building Surveying, Quantity Surveying and Commercial Management.

Where to study:

• University College of Estate Management (UCEM)

 

 Office Broker  

      An Office Broker arranges transactions between a company or an individual interested in renting office space and an office space owner. They help office space owners to advertise their space, and then make a commission when the deal is made. 

Responsibilities include:

• Finding office space in accordance with clients’ needs and specifications.
• Requesting a property condition disclosure form and any others that may be needed from the office space provider.
• Requesting information from the office space provider in order to describe the property successfully for advertising.
• Listing the office space as available to rent to the public, usually online.
• Advertising the office space through listings, newsletters, promotions and other methods. 

Salary:

• Starting salaries for trainee positions can range from £14,000 to £20,000. With experience, this can go up to £60,000, plus commission.
• In certain management positions and if you’re in a high-end London agency, you can earn up to £100,000.

 What to study:

• You don’t need a degree to become an office broker, but you can obtain a CPD qualification for an Estate Agent Diploma. 

 

Property Manager 

A Property Manager cares for a building for the sake of the building and its owner. They collect rent, deal with building maintenance and any maintenance issues the tenants may have. A Property Manager may also be asked to provide site inspections and evaluations, renovations and security. They are also tasked with hiring onsite staff for security, janitorial, general maintenance and landscape. 

 Responsibilities include:

• Setting rent level to attract tenants to the property.
• Understanding the market where a property is located.
• Collecting rent and ensuring optimal cash flow by setting a date for rent collection, and strictly enforcing late fees.
• Adjusting rent.
• Screening tenants by running credit checks and criminal background checks.
• Handling leases.
• Handling complaints and emergencies within the building, such as maintenance requests and noise complaints.
• Inspecting a property when a tenant moves out, checking for damage, determining which portion of the security deposit will be returned to the tenant.
• Dealing with evictions.

Salary:

• The average salary for a property manager is £25,000.

What to study:

• BSc Real Estate Management.

Where to study:

• UCEM
• Kingston University
• Oxford Brookes University
• University of Reading
• University of Westminster
• London South Bank University 

 

Facilities Manager 

A Facilities Manager is hired by a company owning and occupying one or several buildings, and cares for the company’s building. 

Responsibilities include:

• Cleaning.
• Catering and vending.
• Health and safety.
• Procurement and contract management.
• Security.
• Space management.
• Utilities and communications infrastructure. 

Salary:

• Starting salaries range from £20,000 to £27,000. With experience, salaries can range from £26,000-£45,000, and senior managers can earn up to £60,000. An operations director can earn up to £70,000. 

What to study:

• You don’t need a specific degree or qualification to become a Facilities Manager, but degrees in business studies, construction, hospitality, management and property can help you get ahead. 

 

Engineering Manager 

An Engineering Manager uses the technological problem-solving aspect of engineering, and the organisational, administrative and planning side of management, to oversee the operational performance of engineering-driven enterprises.  

Responsibilities include:

• Coordinating and directing projects.
• Making detailed plans to accomplish goals.
• Planning the installation, testing, operation, maintenance and repair of facilities and equipment.
• Recruiting employees.
• Overseeing the development and maintenance of staff competence. 

What to study:

• BSc or MSc Engineering Management. 

Where to study:

• University of Warwick
• Middlesex University London
• University of Greenwich
• University of Derby
• University of Exeter
• Loughborough University
• University of Lincoln
• Leeds Beckett University
• Northumbria University
• Brunel University

 

Project Manager 

A Project Manager ensures for an on-time and on-budget end result by planning and organising resources and people. Work needs to be tracked to completion, deadlines need to be set and tasks need to be delegated to the project team, identifying any potential risks. Project Managers are responsible for completing project work in line with the plan, and report progress to senior managers.

Responsibilities include:

• Working out budgets, teams and resources.
• Setting goals, scheduling tasks.
• Tracking the progress of a project.
• Evaluating the result to learn for the next project.
• Setting objectives in line with the client’s needs.
• Identifying and managing risks to ensure delivery is on schedule.

Salary:

• Starting salaries are between £20,000 and £35,000.
• With experience, Project Managers can earn up to £80,000, while freelancers’ average rates are between £300 and £500 a day. 

What to study:

• You can enter into a project management career with a degree in any subject. Postgraduate study will help, but is not a pre-requisite. 

 

Structural Engineer

A Structural Engineer plays a key part in a home renovation project and property purchase, specialising in the structure of buildings. They determine the strength and durability of a structure and are a key professional in the construction process.

Responsibilities include:

• Being able to assess the safety of a building.
• Providing specifications and calculations for a building design.
• Suggesting building materials.
• Providing drawings to be used by a building contractor and architect during renovation work.
• Providing information to planning officials to obtain planning permission.
• Carrying out inspections if issues within the structure of a property arise.
• Assessing the damage of a property and identifying possible causes and solutions. 

Salary:

• A Structural Engineer will earn from £26,000 to £32,000 in the first three years of work.
• A Chartered Structural Engineer will make around £45,000, while engineers in senior and directorial positions can make over £65,000.

What to study:

• Structural or Civil Engineering.

Where to study:

• City, University of London
• Liverpool John Moores University
• University of Bradford
• University of Aberdeen
• Coventry University
• Kingston University
• University of Salford
• University of Derby
• University of Bath
• University of Liverpool
• University of Leeds
• University of Manchester
• Heriot-Watt University
• University of Sheffield
• Newcastle University 

 

Leasing Executive

 A Leasing Executive shows prospective tenants available properties to rent or lease, and answers questions about the properties. Knowledge of the real estate market is useful when starting out, and they are the face of the property owners.

Responsibilities include:

• Marketing the property to get prospects in.
• Listing a property under multiple listing services, in local magazines and online.
• Finding appropriate venues to target prospective tenants.
• Taking photos of the property and posting them with ads, or hiring a professional to create video tours of the property.
• Keeping the occupancy rate high.

Salary:

• The average salary for a Leasing Executive/Manager is £34,000.

What to study:

• You don’t need a specific degree to become a Leasing Executive, but degrees in business administration, accounting, finance or real estate will be relevant.

 

Architect

An architect designs new buildings, extensions and alterations to existing buildings, as well as advising on the restoration and conservation of old properties. Architects work closely with clients, making sure to match requirements and that the designs are functional, safe and economical. 

Responsibilities include:

• Consulting with other professionals about design.
• Assessing the needs of a building and the practicality of a project.
• Using IT in design and project management.
• Producing detailed workings, drawings and specifications.
• Specifying the nature of materials required for a project.
• Carrying out regular site visits to check on progress and ensure that the project is running on time and to budget.
• Ensuring that the environmental impact of the project is managed. 

Salary:

• A starting salary will range from £18,000 to £22,000, going up to £35,000 with enough experience. A fully qualified architect can earn up to £45,000, and a senior associate can earn up to £70,000.

What to study:

• BSc Architecture, or a practice-based route through the Royal Institute of British Architects (RIBA).

Where to study:

• Birmingham City School of Architecture and Design
• University of Reading – School of Architecture
• UWE Bristol
• London South Bank University
• University of Salford
• Sheffield Hallam University
• Leeds Beckett University
• Coventry University
• Northumbria University
• University of Westminster
• University of Wolverhampton
• Nottingham Trent University
• University of Brighton
• University of Portsmouth
• University of Central Lancashire
• University of Huddersfield
• Plymouth University
• UCL
• King’s College London
• University of Cambridge
• Middlesex University London
• University of Greenwich
• Loughborough University
• University of Manchester
• Heriot-Watt University
• University of Sheffield